Camera to record microscope training videos

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Gary Laevsky Gary Laevsky
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Camera to record microscope training videos

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Hi All,

Getting a camera to record microscope training videos. Best? Worst? Tripod?
Thanks.

NOT looking forward to this.

--
Best,

Gary Laevsky, Ph.D.
Director, Confocal Imaging Facility
Nikon Center of Excellence
Co-Founder, North Atlantic Microscopy Society (NAMS)
https://namsmicroscopy.com/
Dept. of Molecular Biology
Washington Rd.
Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey, 08544-1014
(O) 609 258 5432
(C) 508 507 1310
Cammer, Michael-2 Cammer, Michael-2
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Re: Camera to record microscope training videos

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Won't any camera work if you're not worried about production values?


Circa 2005 we made a basic confocal training video using a Sony Cybershot camera and free editing software.  When I taught high school art in 2009-2010 we shot a music video using a newer Sony Cybershot and a reduced function version of Adobe Premier.


The point is, any camera will work.

Sony RX100II I use for most things has a video mode.  Most dSLRs have great movie modes (high production values).  Every snapshot digital camera my kids or I have had since 2003 or so has had a video mode.  Cell phones and tablets, laptop computers.
An old Coolsnap HQ with a lens from a gel documentation system will work with voice over later!


Small tabletop tripod, big tall tripod, tape and anything around the lab to prop up and angle a camera.  Hand held is great, especially if you trim/edit shaky beginnings.


I could post a lot more about benefits of video and problems, but you say you are past the philosophy stage.


I will summarize what could be pages into two bullet points:


  *   Beware that after making even one small change to the protocol or instrument, you will need to re-edit the video to avoid confusion or user failure.
  *   We are doing training in-person.  Yes, we like teaching the software operation and image analysis remotely, but we are doing one-on-one work on scopes and if we had videos, this time could be reduced, but we highly doubt eliminated.  So much of training is tactile, experiential, and experimental because samples are highly variable.


Michael Cammer, Sr Research Scientist, DART Microscopy Laboratory

NYU Langone Health, 540 First Avenue, SK2 Microscopy Suite, New York, NY  10016

[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>  http://nyulmc.org/micros  http://microscopynotes.com/

Voice direct only, no text or messages:  1-914-309-3270 and 1-646-501-0567

________________________________
From: Cammer, Michael
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 9:23:43 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Camera to record microscope training videos


Won't any camera work if you're not worried about production values?
Sony RX100II I use for most things has a video mode.  Most dSLRs have great movie modes.  Every snapshot digital camera my kids or I have had since 2003 1or so has had a video mode.  Cell phones and tablets, laptop computers.
An old Coolsnap HQ with a lens from a gel documentation system will work with voiceover later!
Anything will work.

BTW, we train software by screen share in Zoom and do the rest of the training in person with Delta Plus masks and eye coverings.

I don't see how a video could have worked for Thursday's training with samples we had to match on two different scopes.  I could have done the work alone and provided a result, and it would have been faster, but the real purpose is to make the next generation independent.

Videos could greatly reduce in person time by providing basic training, additional concepts, and also be staff efficient.  However, they cannot eliminate in person contact.

Also, over 15 years ago we did try a video for confocal training using a Sony snapshot camera and a computer's video editing software.  But then we made a change to the confocal and realized every time there was a change, even one small change, we had to reedit the video.  And staff complained to me that video training could undermine her job.  And people couldn't ask questions freely.

But is sounds like you are past this point of discussion; any camera should work.

When I taught high school art in 2009-10 we used Premier to edit videos and we barely scratched the surface of its functionality.  Any editing software out there is probably better than when we used to use reel tape...

Anyone posting on TikTok?

Michael Cammer, Sr Research Scientist, DART Microscopy Laboratory
NYU Langone Health, 540 First Avenue, SK2 Microscopy Suite, New York, NY  10016
[hidden email]  http://nyulmc.org/micros  http://microscopynotes.com/
Voice direct only, no text or messages:  1-914-309-3270 and 1-646-501-0567

________________________________
From: Confocal Microscopy List <[hidden email]> on behalf of Gary Laevsky <[hidden email]>
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:30:34 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Camera to record microscope training videos

[EXTERNAL]

*****
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Post images on https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.imgur.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=_3Wgs5RXqSPyumkdgRmUmUFCy9-veRFpG3TrRmGpE1Q&e=  and include the link in your posting.
*****

Hi All,

Getting a camera to record microscope training videos. Best? Worst? Tripod?
Thanks.

NOT looking forward to this.

--
Best,

Gary Laevsky, Ph.D.
Director, Confocal Imaging Facility
Nikon Center of Excellence
Co-Founder, North Atlantic Microscopy Society (NAMS)
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__namsmicroscopy.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=efItba0pbU_be0Bdsr5jbaYiJPz0Cj3A8_ImWAmj3rk&e=
Dept. of Molecular Biology
Washington Rd.
Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey, 08544-1014
(O) 609 258 5432
(C) 508 507 1310
Symeonides, Menelaos Symeonides, Menelaos
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Re: Camera to record microscope training videos

*****
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Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Adding to that, OpenShot Video Editor is a pretty powerful and intuitive free (and open source) video editor, available for any OS platform. Say no to Adobe!

Also, tripod is a must! That way you don't need a second person in the room and can take off your mask so you are more easily understood. You can also very cheaply get a smartphone adapter that will fit any tripod, if that's what you choose to go with for a camera (a very fine choice, I might add).

Mel


----------------------------
Menelaos Symeonides
Post-Doctoral Associate, Thali Lab and Lee Lab
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
University of Vermont
318/208 Stafford Hall
95 Carrigan Dr
Burlington, VT 05405
[hidden email]



-----Original Message-----
From: Confocal Microscopy List <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Cammer, Michael
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 10:41 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Camera to record microscope training videos

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Won't any camera work if you're not worried about production values?


Circa 2005 we made a basic confocal training video using a Sony Cybershot camera and free editing software.  When I taught high school art in 2009-2010 we shot a music video using a newer Sony Cybershot and a reduced function version of Adobe Premier.


The point is, any camera will work.

Sony RX100II I use for most things has a video mode.  Most dSLRs have great movie modes (high production values).  Every snapshot digital camera my kids or I have had since 2003 or so has had a video mode.  Cell phones and tablets, laptop computers.
An old Coolsnap HQ with a lens from a gel documentation system will work with voice over later!


Small tabletop tripod, big tall tripod, tape and anything around the lab to prop up and angle a camera.  Hand held is great, especially if you trim/edit shaky beginnings.


I could post a lot more about benefits of video and problems, but you say you are past the philosophy stage.


I will summarize what could be pages into two bullet points:


  *   Beware that after making even one small change to the protocol or instrument, you will need to re-edit the video to avoid confusion or user failure.
  *   We are doing training in-person.  Yes, we like teaching the software operation and image analysis remotely, but we are doing one-on-one work on scopes and if we had videos, this time could be reduced, but we highly doubt eliminated.  So much of training is tactile, experiential, and experimental because samples are highly variable.


Michael Cammer, Sr Research Scientist, DART Microscopy Laboratory

NYU Langone Health, 540 First Avenue, SK2 Microscopy Suite, New York, NY  10016

[hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>  http://nyulmc.org/micros  http://microscopynotes.com/

Voice direct only, no text or messages:  1-914-309-3270 and 1-646-501-0567

________________________________
From: Cammer, Michael
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 9:23:43 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Camera to record microscope training videos


Won't any camera work if you're not worried about production values?
Sony RX100II I use for most things has a video mode.  Most dSLRs have great movie modes.  Every snapshot digital camera my kids or I have had since 2003 1or so has had a video mode.  Cell phones and tablets, laptop computers.
An old Coolsnap HQ with a lens from a gel documentation system will work with voiceover later!
Anything will work.

BTW, we train software by screen share in Zoom and do the rest of the training in person with Delta Plus masks and eye coverings.

I don't see how a video could have worked for Thursday's training with samples we had to match on two different scopes.  I could have done the work alone and provided a result, and it would have been faster, but the real purpose is to make the next generation independent.

Videos could greatly reduce in person time by providing basic training, additional concepts, and also be staff efficient.  However, they cannot eliminate in person contact.

Also, over 15 years ago we did try a video for confocal training using a Sony snapshot camera and a computer's video editing software.  But then we made a change to the confocal and realized every time there was a change, even one small change, we had to reedit the video.  And staff complained to me that video training could undermine her job.  And people couldn't ask questions freely.

But is sounds like you are past this point of discussion; any camera should work.

When I taught high school art in 2009-10 we used Premier to edit videos and we barely scratched the surface of its functionality.  Any editing software out there is probably better than when we used to use reel tape...

Anyone posting on TikTok?

Michael Cammer, Sr Research Scientist, DART Microscopy Laboratory NYU Langone Health, 540 First Avenue, SK2 Microscopy Suite, New York, NY  10016 [hidden email]  http://nyulmc.org/micros  http://microscopynotes.com/ Voice direct only, no text or messages:  1-914-309-3270 and 1-646-501-0567

________________________________
From: Confocal Microscopy List <[hidden email]> on behalf of Gary Laevsky <[hidden email]>
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:30:34 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Camera to record microscope training videos

[EXTERNAL]

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__lists.umn.edu_cgi-2Dbin_wa-3FA0-3Dconfocalmicroscopy&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=yBi5iuIGXnzT2mQ51Zte-gjPAYRSrLhk3pVEdUE1AVQ&e=
Post images on https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.imgur.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=_3Wgs5RXqSPyumkdgRmUmUFCy9-veRFpG3TrRmGpE1Q&e=  and include the link in your posting.
*****

Hi All,

Getting a camera to record microscope training videos. Best? Worst? Tripod?
Thanks.

NOT looking forward to this.

--
Best,

Gary Laevsky, Ph.D.
Director, Confocal Imaging Facility
Nikon Center of Excellence
Co-Founder, North Atlantic Microscopy Society (NAMS) https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__namsmicroscopy.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=efItba0pbU_be0Bdsr5jbaYiJPz0Cj3A8_ImWAmj3rk&e=
Dept. of Molecular Biology
Washington Rd.
Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey, 08544-1014
(O) 609 258 5432
(C) 508 507 1310
Craig Brideau Craig Brideau
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Re: Camera to record microscope training videos

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Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Camcorders are still around and fairly available at most camera shops. They
are designed to accept a tripod, and their optics are significantly better
than what you would find on a cell phone. Some models feature attachments
for better microphones as well. If you will be putting your lessons on the
web, 1080 or 720p are more than adequate resolutions, so you can skip the
4k models. They are also still fairly small, so they can be squeezed within
small microscope rooms to catch the action. Finally, since they are
relatively lightweight, you don't need an overly expensive tripod to mount
them.

Craig

On Sun, Aug 30, 2020 at 12:45 PM Symeonides, Menelaos <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> Adding to that, OpenShot Video Editor is a pretty powerful and intuitive
> free (and open source) video editor, available for any OS platform. Say no
> to Adobe!
>
> Also, tripod is a must! That way you don't need a second person in the
> room and can take off your mask so you are more easily understood. You can
> also very cheaply get a smartphone adapter that will fit any tripod, if
> that's what you choose to go with for a camera (a very fine choice, I might
> add).
>
> Mel
>
>
> ----------------------------
> Menelaos Symeonides
> Post-Doctoral Associate, Thali Lab and Lee Lab
> Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
> University of Vermont
> 318/208 Stafford Hall
> 95 Carrigan Dr
> Burlington, VT 05405
> [hidden email]
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Confocal Microscopy List <[hidden email]> On
> Behalf Of Cammer, Michael
> Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 10:41 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: Camera to record microscope training videos
>
> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> Won't any camera work if you're not worried about production values?
>
>
> Circa 2005 we made a basic confocal training video using a Sony Cybershot
> camera and free editing software.  When I taught high school art in
> 2009-2010 we shot a music video using a newer Sony Cybershot and a reduced
> function version of Adobe Premier.
>
>
> The point is, any camera will work.
>
> Sony RX100II I use for most things has a video mode.  Most dSLRs have
> great movie modes (high production values).  Every snapshot digital camera
> my kids or I have had since 2003 or so has had a video mode.  Cell phones
> and tablets, laptop computers.
> An old Coolsnap HQ with a lens from a gel documentation system will work
> with voice over later!
>
>
> Small tabletop tripod, big tall tripod, tape and anything around the lab
> to prop up and angle a camera.  Hand held is great, especially if you
> trim/edit shaky beginnings.
>
>
> I could post a lot more about benefits of video and problems, but you say
> you are past the philosophy stage.
>
>
> I will summarize what could be pages into two bullet points:
>
>
>   *   Beware that after making even one small change to the protocol or
> instrument, you will need to re-edit the video to avoid confusion or user
> failure.
>   *   We are doing training in-person.  Yes, we like teaching the software
> operation and image analysis remotely, but we are doing one-on-one work on
> scopes and if we had videos, this time could be reduced, but we highly
> doubt eliminated.  So much of training is tactile, experiential, and
> experimental because samples are highly variable.
>
>
> Michael Cammer, Sr Research Scientist, DART Microscopy Laboratory
>
> NYU Langone Health, 540 First Avenue, SK2 Microscopy Suite, New York, NY
> 10016
>
> [hidden email]<mailto:[hidden email]>
> http://nyulmc.org/micros  http://microscopynotes.com/
>
> Voice direct only, no text or messages:  1-914-309-3270 and 1-646-501-0567
>
> ________________________________
> From: Cammer, Michael
> Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 9:23:43 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: Camera to record microscope training videos
>
>
> Won't any camera work if you're not worried about production values?
> Sony RX100II I use for most things has a video mode.  Most dSLRs have
> great movie modes.  Every snapshot digital camera my kids or I have had
> since 2003 1or so has had a video mode.  Cell phones and tablets, laptop
> computers.
> An old Coolsnap HQ with a lens from a gel documentation system will work
> with voiceover later!
> Anything will work.
>
> BTW, we train software by screen share in Zoom and do the rest of the
> training in person with Delta Plus masks and eye coverings.
>
> I don't see how a video could have worked for Thursday's training with
> samples we had to match on two different scopes.  I could have done the
> work alone and provided a result, and it would have been faster, but the
> real purpose is to make the next generation independent.
>
> Videos could greatly reduce in person time by providing basic training,
> additional concepts, and also be staff efficient.  However, they cannot
> eliminate in person contact.
>
> Also, over 15 years ago we did try a video for confocal training using a
> Sony snapshot camera and a computer's video editing software.  But then we
> made a change to the confocal and realized every time there was a change,
> even one small change, we had to reedit the video.  And staff complained to
> me that video training could undermine her job.  And people couldn't ask
> questions freely.
>
> But is sounds like you are past this point of discussion; any camera
> should work.
>
> When I taught high school art in 2009-10 we used Premier to edit videos
> and we barely scratched the surface of its functionality.  Any editing
> software out there is probably better than when we used to use reel tape...
>
> Anyone posting on TikTok?
>
> Michael Cammer, Sr Research Scientist, DART Microscopy Laboratory NYU
> Langone Health, 540 First Avenue, SK2 Microscopy Suite, New York, NY  10016
> [hidden email]  http://nyulmc.org/micros
> http://microscopynotes.com/ Voice direct only, no text or messages:
> 1-914-309-3270 and 1-646-501-0567
>
> ________________________________
> From: Confocal Microscopy List <[hidden email]> on
> behalf of Gary Laevsky <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:30:34 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Camera to record microscope training videos
>
> [EXTERNAL]
>
> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
>
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__lists.umn.edu_cgi-2Dbin_wa-3FA0-3Dconfocalmicroscopy&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=yBi5iuIGXnzT2mQ51Zte-gjPAYRSrLhk3pVEdUE1AVQ&e=
> Post images on
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.imgur.com&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=_3Wgs5RXqSPyumkdgRmUmUFCy9-veRFpG3TrRmGpE1Q&e=
> and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> Hi All,
>
> Getting a camera to record microscope training videos. Best? Worst? Tripod?
> Thanks.
>
> NOT looking forward to this.
>
> --
> Best,
>
> Gary Laevsky, Ph.D.
> Director, Confocal Imaging Facility
> Nikon Center of Excellence
> Co-Founder, North Atlantic Microscopy Society (NAMS)
> https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__namsmicroscopy.com_&d=DwIBaQ&c=j5oPpO0eBH1iio48DtsedeElZfc04rx3ExJHeIIZuCs&r=hUBj2D5n6oKThx2L01qn8IORZb5f-ruLVXPmQ1zQNnM&m=hRAdtdDTm-jBS52ttRNv7YOR7v_8IptJjXuqQUBm5n4&s=efItba0pbU_be0Bdsr5jbaYiJPz0Cj3A8_ImWAmj3rk&e=
> Dept. of Molecular Biology
> Washington Rd.
> Princeton University
> Princeton, New Jersey, 08544-1014
> (O) 609 258 5432
> (C) 508 507 1310
>
Ferhan A Ferhan A
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Re: Camera to record microscope training videos

In reply to this post by Gary Laevsky
*****
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*****

My setup is the following:

1) Lightweight compact tripod (Rollei Compact Traveler Star Smartphone
Holder)

https://www.amazon.com/Rollei-Compact-Traveler-Star-DIGI/dp/B00775N7O2

I bought this tripod originally for bike touring (lightweight), fully
functional tripod (all angles) designed for small cameras (<2kg) and mobile
phones. Can be easily stowed away (40cm) extends to 4x (120cm), cheap (
Є15 / $22), stable, lightweight (aluminium) and manufactured by a German
company (No commercial affiliation with Germany)


2) Smartphone Tripod Mount
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B00EPWYP78/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_nCktFbAK6BRPM

Adjustable size (spring loaded) up to 83 mm wide phones. (Є7.5 / $ 9)


3) Camera: Samsung Note 10 Lite

The stylus of the phone doubles (or triples, quadruples) as a remote
control. It's very handy while sitting by the microscope and self
recording.

A side note here: I have no commercial affiliation with stylus-bearing
Android phones, but I have to say that after using a phone with a stylus
(Note 8), iNever looked back. Probably, I will not be able to convert any
iHeads out there but it makes a big difference to have a stylus embedded
in your phone. Quick note taking, drawing ideas, selected area (precise)
screen capturing, faster and precise text selection, quick-magnify tiny
text on websites, faster typing with less mistakes, using phone with thick
gloves etc. It’s like having a mouse on a desktop computer. /praise

4) As for the software, I use Camtasia. It’s great for screen capturing
(microscope software menus and mouse moves/clicks) and also for movie
editing. Movie editing functions are so satisfactory, that I don’t need to
use any additional movie editor anymore (such as Adobe Premiere).
Multitrack audio-video, a variety of audio-video effects (e.g: fading),
captions, annotations, various export options etc. It’s not free, but dual
functionality (screen capture and movie editing) worth the cost. (Є260 / $
310
single user, 2 computers).

Best regards,

Ferhan



---
Ferhan Ayaydin, Ph.D.
---
Head of Advanced Core Facility
H-CEMM, Hungarian Centre of Excellence for Molecular Medicine
Functional Cell Biology and Immunology Advanced Core Facility
University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine, 6720 Szeged, Hungary
---
Head of Core Facility, Senior research associate (Interim, part-time)
Biological Research Centre, Cellular Imaging Laboratory
Temesvári krt. 62, 6726 Szeged, Hungary
---
Research associate (part-time)
University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine,
Albert Szent-Györgyi Health Centre
Interdisciplinary R&D and Innovation Center of Excellence
Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Szeged
Korányi fasor 6, 6720 Szeged, Hungary

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Ariel, Pablo Ariel, Pablo
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Re: Camera to record microscope training videos

In reply to this post by Gary Laevsky
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I've made a lot of training videos recently, and this is what I've learned:
- You can use your cell phone for recording. The quality is good enough, even in the dark.
- Get a tripod. I bought the one recommended for cell phones in wirecutters and it has worked well.
- For software operation, record the screen directly, with OBS Studio. Cell phone videos of the screen tend to be terrible. I made some of these at the beginning and cringe when I watch them now.
- I ended up using Adobe Premiere for editing, which is overkill, but has anything you might need and is not hard to use if you are doing basic things. We have a license at my institution so price was not an issue.
- Recording and editing these videos takes a lot of time; plan accordingly.
- I've used YouTube for distribution, and it has worked well.

You can see the results here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTqLyJ-2uBIl0hHV9mD4pCQ/playlists
The production quality is very bad, but the content is there for my users.

I've found that when users watch the videos in advance, semi-remote trainings (me in my office, user in the microscope room, zoom screensharing, etc) go very well. For the small minority of users that don't do their homework, the remote trainings are frustrating for everyone involved.


Good luck.

Pablo


Pablo Ariel, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Director of the Microscopy Services Laboratory
Brinkhous-Bullitt Bldg B04
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
http://www.med.unc.edu/microscopy
Tel: 919-966-2413



-----Original Message-----
From: Confocal Microscopy List <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Gary Laevsky
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:31 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Camera to record microscope training videos

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Hi All,

Getting a camera to record microscope training videos. Best? Worst? Tripod?
Thanks.

NOT looking forward to this.

--
Best,

Gary Laevsky, Ph.D.
Director, Confocal Imaging Facility
Nikon Center of Excellence
Co-Founder, North Atlantic Microscopy Society (NAMS) https://namsmicroscopy.com/ Dept. of Molecular Biology Washington Rd.
Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey, 08544-1014
(O) 609 258 5432
(C) 508 507 1310
Peter Brunt Peter Brunt
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Re: Camera to record microscope training videos

In reply to this post by Gary Laevsky
*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

For simple stuff you can use your phone. For the most effective level of engagement, doing a combination of video showing the hardware and then recording from the computer what's going on with the software works well. This keeps things varied and the watcher paying attention.

Camtasia is pretty good for this and means you don't have to record everything in one go, you can splice in lots of shorter recordings to get the point across.


Best Regards
 
Peter Brunt


Peter Brunt (MPhys)
VP of Sales

Direct Dial:            585.445.7588
Email:                     [hidden email]
Web:                      www.avr-optics.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Confocal Microscopy List <[hidden email]> On Behalf Of Gary Laevsky
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:31 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Camera to record microscope training videos

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Hi All,

Getting a camera to record microscope training videos. Best? Worst? Tripod?
Thanks.

NOT looking forward to this.

--
Best,

Gary Laevsky, Ph.D.
Director, Confocal Imaging Facility
Nikon Center of Excellence
Co-Founder, North Atlantic Microscopy Society (NAMS) https://namsmicroscopy.com/ Dept. of Molecular Biology Washington Rd.
Princeton University
Princeton, New Jersey, 08544-1014
(O) 609 258 5432
(C) 508 507 1310