commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

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rominy rominy
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commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

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Hello all

I am looking for some feedback from people that do Multi Photon imaging, possibly in a core facility environment.  Has anybody here compared different available Multi-Photon systems for both performance and versatility (multi-user environment)?  Any reviews on standalone systems as well as those attached to a confocal microscopes with pros and cons of each from your experience would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks very much in advance, you have always been very helpful

Yevgeniy Romin

=====================================================================

     Please note that this e-mail and any files transmitted from
     Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center may be privileged, confidential,
     and protected from disclosure under applicable law. If the reader of
     this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent
     responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient,
     you are hereby notified that any reading, dissemination, distribution,
     copying, or other use of this communication or any of its attachments
     is strictly prohibited.  If you have received this communication in
     error, please notify the sender immediately by replying to this message
     and deleting this message, any attachments, and all copies and backups
     from your computer.
Craig Brideau Craig Brideau
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Re: commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

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If you are looking for a general-purpose multiphoton system, especially for
a core facility, local service and support trumps all other considerations.
For general use most systems are pretty effective. I find generally that
where one brand has a particular advantage over another is for particular
subsets of sample types (cells/tissue/live/exvivo/organs/skin/nerves) where
you will find some pros and cons amongst the different systems. You will
find that a confocal/2P combination is quite versatile since it is also
useful for thin samples and an adjustable pinhole can be handy.
Some general comments for core use in no particular order:
If you plan to do live animal work your requirements change significantly.
Choose what works well with the local software ecosystem: if you are unable
to process the data efficiently you will lose users. If you use unfamiliar
software you will spend considerable time training and troubleshooting.
How are you going to handle the data (transport and storage)?
Does the system support the kinds of objective lenses you think you will be
using?
Are the locals familiar with the software to control the system, and if
not, are training resources readily available?
What are the expected maintenance costs? Is a third-party service provider
for this make/model available in your area?

Just some thoughts off the top of my head that I hope are useful to you.

Craig




On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 1:53 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:

> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> Hello all
>
> I am looking for some feedback from people that do Multi Photon imaging,
> possibly in a core facility environment.  Has anybody here compared
> different available Multi-Photon systems for both performance and
> versatility (multi-user environment)?  Any reviews on standalone systems as
> well as those attached to a confocal microscopes with pros and cons of each
> from your experience would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks very much in advance, you have always been very helpful
>
> Yevgeniy Romin
>
> =====================================================================
>
>      Please note that this e-mail and any files transmitted from
>      Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center may be privileged,
> confidential,
>      and protected from disclosure under applicable law. If the reader of
>      this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent
>      responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient,
>      you are hereby notified that any reading, dissemination, distribution,
>      copying, or other use of this communication or any of its attachments
>      is strictly prohibited.  If you have received this communication in
>      error, please notify the sender immediately by replying to this
> message
>      and deleting this message, any attachments, and all copies and backups
>      from your computer.
>
Rosemary.White Rosemary.White
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Re: commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

*****
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*****

Yes, all of this! Local service and support are key. I’d also add – include the cost of 5-year full extended warranty in the purchase price – i.e. including all service and parts. That way you don’t have to haggle about it each year.

cheers,
Rosemary

On 16/3/17, 10:40 am, "Confocal Microscopy List on behalf of Craig Brideau" <[hidden email] on behalf of [hidden email]> wrote:

    *****
    To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
    http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
    Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
    *****
   
    If you are looking for a general-purpose multiphoton system, especially for
    a core facility, local service and support trumps all other considerations.
    For general use most systems are pretty effective. I find generally that
    where one brand has a particular advantage over another is for particular
    subsets of sample types (cells/tissue/live/exvivo/organs/skin/nerves) where
    you will find some pros and cons amongst the different systems. You will
    find that a confocal/2P combination is quite versatile since it is also
    useful for thin samples and an adjustable pinhole can be handy.
    Some general comments for core use in no particular order:
    If you plan to do live animal work your requirements change significantly.
    Choose what works well with the local software ecosystem: if you are unable
    to process the data efficiently you will lose users. If you use unfamiliar
    software you will spend considerable time training and troubleshooting.
    How are you going to handle the data (transport and storage)?
    Does the system support the kinds of objective lenses you think you will be
    using?
    Are the locals familiar with the software to control the system, and if
    not, are training resources readily available?
    What are the expected maintenance costs? Is a third-party service provider
    for this make/model available in your area?
   
    Just some thoughts off the top of my head that I hope are useful to you.
   
    Craig
   
   
   
   
    On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 1:53 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
   
    > *****
    > To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
    > http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
    > Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
    > *****
    >
    > Hello all
    >
    > I am looking for some feedback from people that do Multi Photon imaging,
    > possibly in a core facility environment.  Has anybody here compared
    > different available Multi-Photon systems for both performance and
    > versatility (multi-user environment)?  Any reviews on standalone systems as
    > well as those attached to a confocal microscopes with pros and cons of each
    > from your experience would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks very much in advance, you have always been very helpful
    >
    > Yevgeniy Romin
    >
    > =====================================================================
    >
    >      Please note that this e-mail and any files transmitted from
    >      Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center may be privileged,
    > confidential,
    >      and protected from disclosure under applicable law. If the reader of
    >      this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent
    >      responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient,
    >      you are hereby notified that any reading, dissemination, distribution,
    >      copying, or other use of this communication or any of its attachments
    >      is strictly prohibited.  If you have received this communication in
    >      error, please notify the sender immediately by replying to this
    > message
    >      and deleting this message, any attachments, and all copies and backups
    >      from your computer.
    >
   

Andrew Andrew
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Re: commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

In reply to this post by Craig Brideau
*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Craig Brideau shared a concise and very insightful response.  If Craig
is a drinking man, I believe you owe him a beer.

Get in touch with others locally who have your prospective system, and
try to meet in person or by phone to discuss their experience with
technical support.  Your average facility manager is constantly dealing
with something that was broken or that crapped-out on them, but some
have great, trusted customer service technicians while others are losing
a little more sleep.  Parallel to learning about your local technical
support,... how advanced are your user's and their requirements; what
data are they typically looking to collect; what potential experimental
setups are effectively excluded by going with the needs of the majority,
and are users ok with that choice; are the users expecting the
system/software to collect and process all data; etc. (see Craig's
response).

The only poor experiences I've had with the many confocal and 2-photon
systems I've used were due to poor instrument service, poor facility
management, or poorly matched or managed software with respect to
intended users.  Example: reps and facility management leaving every
ambiguous icon visible in the default view of, for example, an A1RMP's
software window, totally overwhelming the new user I'm tasked with
training (cue all reps collectively pointing index fingers at the
facility managers who didn't want them hiding tools).  Another example:
a highly customizable systems, like a TrimScopeII, can be exactly what
your specific group needs,... it can also become a rollercoaster of
emotions if not lovingly supported and managed by a microscopy expert
for the life of the equipment (preferably a German speaking one) and
brilliant and responsive service technicians.  The last thing you want
is to find yourself repeatedly in a situation where one moment your
2-photon is working and the data is amazing, then suddenly a PMT or
motor or, heavens-forbid, the software starts acting weird, your
troubleshooting is not helping, and now a user has to put an animal down
and many others have to postpone their work while you send a strongly
worded e-mail to a customer support team you were unable to vet.

A great system from a manger's perspective is one where the tech support
team is highly regarded, the hardware is rock solid, software is
intuitive for newcomers but with depth for advanced users, and also
effectively gets out of the way of experimenters doing their already
complicated enough work.  For example, Zeiss's Zen software has spoiled
me for efficiently building great workflows on new projects, effectively
training new users, and helping prevent me from screwing up my work in
hour 4 thank to many small but brilliant choices that their software
developers made ten years ago.  However there are always trade-offs; a
massive real world issue with Zeiss is their typical price tag is
shocking (sorry guys, I dig your stuff, maybe consider sponsoring the
startup I work at? ok that would be great thanks).

Now I'm not saying, 'buddy, you're in cancer research; take a few sacks
of money from the pile and buy the most expensive system on the
market'.  Again, what is support like in your area for the different
manufacturers, do you need a specific style of microscope or a heavily
modified system for your users, etc.etc..

Final note; this is not an anonymous forum, so you may not receive a lot
of critical feedback.  Also some facility managers have only ever used
one manufacturer or one service company, so may not have much experience
with alternatives (nor a desire to openly criticize the heroes who fix
their complicated toys).  I'm in biotech, with a false sense of
insulation from microscopy industry folks being displeased with my
remarks, but even I sanitized this reply.

Best of luck!
Andrew


--
Andrew Woolley, Ph.D.
707.490.9231
www.ajwoolley.com



On 3/15/2017 4:40 PM, Craig Brideau wrote:

> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> If you are looking for a general-purpose multiphoton system, especially for
> a core facility, local service and support trumps all other considerations.
> For general use most systems are pretty effective. I find generally that
> where one brand has a particular advantage over another is for particular
> subsets of sample types (cells/tissue/live/exvivo/organs/skin/nerves) where
> you will find some pros and cons amongst the different systems. You will
> find that a confocal/2P combination is quite versatile since it is also
> useful for thin samples and an adjustable pinhole can be handy.
> Some general comments for core use in no particular order:
> If you plan to do live animal work your requirements change significantly.
> Choose what works well with the local software ecosystem: if you are unable
> to process the data efficiently you will lose users. If you use unfamiliar
> software you will spend considerable time training and troubleshooting.
> How are you going to handle the data (transport and storage)?
> Does the system support the kinds of objective lenses you think you will be
> using?
> Are the locals familiar with the software to control the system, and if
> not, are training resources readily available?
> What are the expected maintenance costs? Is a third-party service provider
> for this make/model available in your area?
>
> Just some thoughts off the top of my head that I hope are useful to you.
>
> Craig
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 1:53 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> *****
>> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
>> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
>> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
>> *****
>>
>> Hello all
>>
>> I am looking for some feedback from people that do Multi Photon imaging,
>> possibly in a core facility environment.  Has anybody here compared
>> different available Multi-Photon systems for both performance and
>> versatility (multi-user environment)?  Any reviews on standalone systems as
>> well as those attached to a confocal microscopes with pros and cons of each
>> from your experience would be greatly appreciated.
>>
>> Thanks very much in advance, you have always been very helpful
>>
>> Yevgeniy Romin
>>
>> =====================================================================
>>
>>       Please note that this e-mail and any files transmitted from
>>       Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center may be privileged,
>> confidential,
>>       and protected from disclosure under applicable law. If the reader of
>>       this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent
>>       responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient,
>>       you are hereby notified that any reading, dissemination, distribution,
>>       copying, or other use of this communication or any of its attachments
>>       is strictly prohibited.  If you have received this communication in
>>       error, please notify the sender immediately by replying to this
>> message
>>       and deleting this message, any attachments, and all copies and backups
>>       from your computer.
>>
Kate Luby-Phelps Kate Luby-Phelps
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Re: commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

In reply to this post by rominy
*****
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http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Hi Rominy,

We have a Zeiss LSM780 with a Coherent Vision laser and a BiG two channel non-descanned detector on an upright AxioExaminer stand in our multiuser core and it has proved very useful. Based on about five years experience with multiphoton in a multiuser core facility here are some additional things to put into your equation:

1. First of all, what applications do you anticipate? If you need to go as deep as possible (approx. 1mm) then you will need objectives with long working distance, optimally water immersion if your samples are aqueous, and you might need to customize your lightpath for deepest possible imaging (not possible with every commercial vendor). I have known people to choose the vendor based on what objectives are offered and/or how accessible the lightpath is to modification.

2. If you are going to do live animal imaging in a variety of tissues, you might find that the biggest challenge is getting the animal on the stage in the correct orientation and immobilized. We opted to let the users solve those logistical problems themselves as we have many users with different requirements. With the availability of 3D printing or a good machine shop, custom solutions are within the reach of most investigators.

3. It can be difficult or impossible to excite far red probes like CY5 with NIR lasers. If that is important you might want to consider including an OPO or other solution for this issue.

4. I have always found that a extensive hands on demo with my own users' samples is helpful for uncovering unanticipated details that can help you with your decision.  

Have fun shopping!

Kate
Craig Brideau Craig Brideau
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*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

On Mar 15, 2017 8:59 PM, "Andrew" <[hidden email]> wrote:


Craig Brideau shared a concise and very insightful response.  If Craig is a
drinking man, I believe you owe him a beer.


Please, no more beer, my fridge is full from the last couple times I fixed
a laser launch for a colleague. :)

Your average facility manager is constantly dealing with something that was
broken or that crapped-out on them, but some have great, trusted customer
service technicians while others are losing a little more sleep.


I recommend something stronger than beer for those folks.

are the users expecting the system/software to collect and process all
data; etc. (see Craig's response).


I recommend using different machines for collecting vs processing the data.
It is a waste of a very expensive instrument to have it idle while its
computer is appropriated to crunch numbers.

Example: reps and facility management leaving every ambiguous icon visible
in the default view of, for example, an A1RMP's software window, totally
overwhelming the new user I'm tasked with training (cue all reps
collectively pointing index fingers at the facility managers who didn't
want them hiding tools).


Local reps who have been around long enough tend to learn what groups can
handle what levels of complexity. If your rep is brand-new you will need to
be very specific with what you want. A more seasoned local rep will be more
familiar with the user level and requirements of various facilities.

  Another example: a highly customizable systems, like a TrimScopeII, can
be exactly what your specific group needs,... it can also become a
rollercoaster of emotions if not lovingly supported and managed by a
microscopy expert for the life of the equipment (preferably a German
speaking one)


I had to get a German-speaking colleague to translate the instructions for
an ephys stage once...
Customization is great for specific functions, less so for a core unless
your staff is very technically advanced.

and now a user has to put an animal down and many others have to postpone
their work while you send a strongly worded e-mail to a customer support
team you were unable to vet.


Systems for animal work in particular need to be highly reliable for this
reason. Not only do they have to be optomechanically reliable, but they
have to have very simple and clear workflows. The user is already
cognitively burdened with keeping the animal alive; they shouldn't have to
concentrate very hard on getting the microscope to function.


However there are always trade-offs; a massive real world issue with Zeiss
is their typical price tag is shocking


I have had the same experience. Given how the performance gap is closing
amongst the usual suspects, I'm surprised at the pricing differences.

do you need a specific style of microscope or a heavily modified system for
your users


For a core, be aware that it is possible to over-specialize a piece of
equipment for one group, and thus render it unusable for another group. You
have to balance special requirements against the general usability of the
equipment.

Final note; this is not an anonymous forum, so you may not receive a lot of
critical feedback.  Also some facility managers have only ever used one
manufacturer or one service company, so may not have much experience with
alternatives (nor a desire to openly criticize the heroes who fix their
complicated toys).  I'm in biotech, with a false sense of insulation from
microscopy industry folks being displeased with my remarks, but even I
sanitized this reply.


One nice thing about the list is you can always privately email the users
if you have specific questions. That said, from my perspective I dislike
trash-talking any one manufacturer because it really all comes down to
local representation in your area. I might call out one particular aspect
of a piece of equipment as particularly good or particularly bad, but I
have learned to avoid generalizations. Tribalism in brands does no favours
to anybody since we are dealing with a global market.

Craig



Best of luck!
Andrew


--
Andrew Woolley, Ph.D.
707.490.9231
www.ajwoolley.com




On 3/15/2017 4:40 PM, Craig Brideau wrote:

> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> If you are looking for a general-purpose multiphoton system, especially for
> a core facility, local service and support trumps all other considerations.
> For general use most systems are pretty effective. I find generally that
> where one brand has a particular advantage over another is for particular
> subsets of sample types (cells/tissue/live/exvivo/organs/skin/nerves)
> where
> you will find some pros and cons amongst the different systems. You will
> find that a confocal/2P combination is quite versatile since it is also
> useful for thin samples and an adjustable pinhole can be handy.
> Some general comments for core use in no particular order:
> If you plan to do live animal work your requirements change significantly.
> Choose what works well with the local software ecosystem: if you are unable
> to process the data efficiently you will lose users. If you use unfamiliar
> software you will spend considerable time training and troubleshooting.
> How are you going to handle the data (transport and storage)?
> Does the system support the kinds of objective lenses you think you will be
> using?
> Are the locals familiar with the software to control the system, and if
> not, are training resources readily available?
> What are the expected maintenance costs? Is a third-party service provider
> for this make/model available in your area?
>
> Just some thoughts off the top of my head that I hope are useful to you.
>
> Craig
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 1:53 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> *****
>> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
>> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
>> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
>> *****
>>
>> Hello all
>>
>> I am looking for some feedback from people that do Multi Photon imaging,
>> possibly in a core facility environment.  Has anybody here compared
>> different available Multi-Photon systems for both performance and
>> versatility (multi-user environment)?  Any reviews on standalone systems
>> as
>> well as those attached to a confocal microscopes with pros and cons of
>> each
>> from your experience would be greatly appreciated.
>>
>> Thanks very much in advance, you have always been very helpful
>>
>> Yevgeniy Romin
>>
>> =====================================================================
>>
>>       Please note that this e-mail and any files transmitted from
>>       Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center may be privileged,
>> confidential,
>>       and protected from disclosure under applicable law. If the reader of
>>       this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent
>>       responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient,
>>       you are hereby notified that any reading, dissemination,
>> distribution,
>>       copying, or other use of this communication or any of its
>> attachments
>>       is strictly prohibited.  If you have received this communication in
>>       error, please notify the sender immediately by replying to this
>> message
>>       and deleting this message, any attachments, and all copies and
>> backups
>>       from your computer.
>>
>>
rominy rominy
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Re: commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

Thank you very much for your responses, both on and off the list.  I will definitely take advantage of all your advice.


Yevgeniy Romin
________________________________________
From: Confocal Microscopy List [[hidden email]] on behalf of Craig Brideau [[hidden email]]
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:04 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: commercially available multi-photon systems reviews

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

On Mar 15, 2017 8:59 PM, "Andrew" <[hidden email]> wrote:


Craig Brideau shared a concise and very insightful response.  If Craig is a
drinking man, I believe you owe him a beer.


Please, no more beer, my fridge is full from the last couple times I fixed
a laser launch for a colleague. :)

Your average facility manager is constantly dealing with something that was
broken or that crapped-out on them, but some have great, trusted customer
service technicians while others are losing a little more sleep.


I recommend something stronger than beer for those folks.

are the users expecting the system/software to collect and process all
data; etc. (see Craig's response).


I recommend using different machines for collecting vs processing the data.
It is a waste of a very expensive instrument to have it idle while its
computer is appropriated to crunch numbers.

Example: reps and facility management leaving every ambiguous icon visible
in the default view of, for example, an A1RMP's software window, totally
overwhelming the new user I'm tasked with training (cue all reps
collectively pointing index fingers at the facility managers who didn't
want them hiding tools).


Local reps who have been around long enough tend to learn what groups can
handle what levels of complexity. If your rep is brand-new you will need to
be very specific with what you want. A more seasoned local rep will be more
familiar with the user level and requirements of various facilities.

  Another example: a highly customizable systems, like a TrimScopeII, can
be exactly what your specific group needs,... it can also become a
rollercoaster of emotions if not lovingly supported and managed by a
microscopy expert for the life of the equipment (preferably a German
speaking one)


I had to get a German-speaking colleague to translate the instructions for
an ephys stage once...
Customization is great for specific functions, less so for a core unless
your staff is very technically advanced.

and now a user has to put an animal down and many others have to postpone
their work while you send a strongly worded e-mail to a customer support
team you were unable to vet.


Systems for animal work in particular need to be highly reliable for this
reason. Not only do they have to be optomechanically reliable, but they
have to have very simple and clear workflows. The user is already
cognitively burdened with keeping the animal alive; they shouldn't have to
concentrate very hard on getting the microscope to function.


However there are always trade-offs; a massive real world issue with Zeiss
is their typical price tag is shocking


I have had the same experience. Given how the performance gap is closing
amongst the usual suspects, I'm surprised at the pricing differences.

do you need a specific style of microscope or a heavily modified system for
your users


For a core, be aware that it is possible to over-specialize a piece of
equipment for one group, and thus render it unusable for another group. You
have to balance special requirements against the general usability of the
equipment.

Final note; this is not an anonymous forum, so you may not receive a lot of
critical feedback.  Also some facility managers have only ever used one
manufacturer or one service company, so may not have much experience with
alternatives (nor a desire to openly criticize the heroes who fix their
complicated toys).  I'm in biotech, with a false sense of insulation from
microscopy industry folks being displeased with my remarks, but even I
sanitized this reply.


One nice thing about the list is you can always privately email the users
if you have specific questions. That said, from my perspective I dislike
trash-talking any one manufacturer because it really all comes down to
local representation in your area. I might call out one particular aspect
of a piece of equipment as particularly good or particularly bad, but I
have learned to avoid generalizations. Tribalism in brands does no favours
to anybody since we are dealing with a global market.

Craig



Best of luck!
Andrew


--
Andrew Woolley, Ph.D.
707.490.9231
www.ajwoolley.com




On 3/15/2017 4:40 PM, Craig Brideau wrote:

> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> If you are looking for a general-purpose multiphoton system, especially for
> a core facility, local service and support trumps all other considerations.
> For general use most systems are pretty effective. I find generally that
> where one brand has a particular advantage over another is for particular
> subsets of sample types (cells/tissue/live/exvivo/organs/skin/nerves)
> where
> you will find some pros and cons amongst the different systems. You will
> find that a confocal/2P combination is quite versatile since it is also
> useful for thin samples and an adjustable pinhole can be handy.
> Some general comments for core use in no particular order:
> If you plan to do live animal work your requirements change significantly.
> Choose what works well with the local software ecosystem: if you are unable
> to process the data efficiently you will lose users. If you use unfamiliar
> software you will spend considerable time training and troubleshooting.
> How are you going to handle the data (transport and storage)?
> Does the system support the kinds of objective lenses you think you will be
> using?
> Are the locals familiar with the software to control the system, and if
> not, are training resources readily available?
> What are the expected maintenance costs? Is a third-party service provider
> for this make/model available in your area?
>
> Just some thoughts off the top of my head that I hope are useful to you.
>
> Craig
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 15, 2017 at 1:53 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> *****
>> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
>> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
>> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
>> *****
>>
>> Hello all
>>
>> I am looking for some feedback from people that do Multi Photon imaging,
>> possibly in a core facility environment.  Has anybody here compared
>> different available Multi-Photon systems for both performance and
>> versatility (multi-user environment)?  Any reviews on standalone systems
>> as
>> well as those attached to a confocal microscopes with pros and cons of
>> each
>> from your experience would be greatly appreciated.
>>
>> Thanks very much in advance, you have always been very helpful
>>
>> Yevgeniy Romin
>>
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