imaging and fluidic control

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Alessandro Esposito Alessandro Esposito
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imaging and fluidic control

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Dear all,

   I am considering to buy pressure pumps to change media in Ibidi flow chambers in a controlled manner. The most basic experiment is to have a constant flow of media, then switching for a given amount of time to a treatment and bring the cells back into media. After considering logistic around a microscope, I am focusing on pressure pumps and I am now considering FLIOGENT and ELVEFLOW systems. Do you have any recomandation (in public or private) about these or other systems?

Cheers,

Alessandro
Craig Brideau Craig Brideau
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Re: imaging and fluidic control

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What flow rates (i.e. mL/min) are you looking for? Can you handle pulsatile
flow or does it need to be continuous? What is the total volume you plan to
deliver during an experiment, both of 'control' and 'treatment' solutions?

Craig

On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 10:38 AM, Alessandro <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> Dear all,
>
>    I am considering to buy pressure pumps to change media in Ibidi flow
> chambers in a controlled manner. The most basic experiment is to have a
> constant flow of media, then switching for a given amount of time to a
> treatment and bring the cells back into media. After considering logistic
> around a microscope, I am focusing on pressure pumps and I am now
> considering FLIOGENT and ELVEFLOW systems. Do you have any recomandation
> (in public or private) about these or other systems?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Alessandro
>
Phillipa@Aurox Phillipa@Aurox
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Re: imaging and fluidic control

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*****

I used to work for a company called Cellix, based in Dublin, Ireland

Their products might be worth a look as I think they have some new things since I worked there

www.cellixltd.com

Regards

Phillipa

Phillipa Timmins

Head of Sales
Aurox Ltd

Culham Science Centre
Abingdon
OX14 3DB

Tel: +44 1865 407814
Mob: +44 7585 676763

From: Craig Brideau
Sent: 06 June 2017 17:50
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: imaging and fluidic control

*****
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http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
*****

What flow rates (i.e. mL/min) are you looking for? Can you handle pulsatile
flow or does it need to be continuous? What is the total volume you plan to
deliver during an experiment, both of 'control' and 'treatment' solutions?

Craig

On Tue, Jun 6, 2017 at 10:38 AM, Alessandro <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> *****
> To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
> http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
> Post images on http://www.imgur.com and include the link in your posting.
> *****
>
> Dear all,
>
>    I am considering to buy pressure pumps to change media in Ibidi flow
> chambers in a controlled manner. The most basic experiment is to have a
> constant flow of media, then switching for a given amount of time to a
> treatment and bring the cells back into media. After considering logistic
> around a microscope, I am focusing on pressure pumps and I am now
> considering FLIOGENT and ELVEFLOW systems. Do you have any recomandation
> (in public or private) about these or other systems?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Alessandro
>
Raghavendra Palanakar Raghavendra Palanakar
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Re: imaging and fluidic control

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*****
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*****

I am using a system from Bartels-Mikrotechnik, Germany. Inexpensive and very small footprint.  

  Original Message  
From: Alessandro
Sent: Tuesday, 6 June 2017 18:45
To: [hidden email]
Reply To: Confocal Microscopy List
Subject: [CONFOCALMICROSCOPY] imaging and fluidic control

*****
To join, leave or search the confocal microscopy listserv, go to:
http://lists.umn.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=confocalmicroscopy
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*****

Dear all,

I am considering to buy pressure pumps to change media in Ibidi flow chambers in a controlled manner. The most basic experiment is to have a constant flow of media, then switching for a given amount of time to a treatment and bring the cells back into media. After considering logistic around a microscope, I am focusing on pressure pumps and I am now considering FLIOGENT and ELVEFLOW systems. Do you have any recomandation (in public or private) about these or other systems?

Cheers,

Alessandro
Alessandro Esposito Alessandro Esposito
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Re: imaging and fluidic control

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*****
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Dear Craig,

      my requirements are relatevly basic and I could use slef-built sysringe pumps. In fact, I have already built one for very little money. However, I thought to have a bit more control. We use Ibidi u-slides, with channel volumes ~100ul. There are two types of experiments that we are currently performing with manual syringes or just pipetting that I would like to automate in order to increase the success rate of the individual experiments and expand the scope for these.

One example is having cells in a channel imaged for 5 days. After the first day we add a chemotheraoeputic agent and we wash after a couple of hours. Therefore, here speed is not an issue and it is just a matter of replacing the the volume of the channel with one or the other media. Of course, we always do this with an excess of volume as the chemical we are using are anyway inexpensive. We could improve our work by having a constant low flow.

Other experiments will be, for instance, flowing media+EGF for a a few seconds or minutes. Ther reason I am looking for systems that are perhaps better I need immediately is that I would like to to be capable to replicate (and expand on) a paper I really liked: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4670727/

As far as I can tell, they do not report flow rates, unfortunately. However, they show responses that depends on flow and, therefore, I would like to design a system that would permit a constant flow of solutions.

We have in mind to target a flow of 1-10ml/min, with a compact system that may allow solutions to be hosted within the frame incubators of the microscopes.

Cheers,

Alessandro
www.quantitative-microscopy.org
Alessandro Esposito Alessandro Esposito
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Re: imaging and fluidic control

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Dear Philippa,

   thank you, it looks quite interesting,

Cheers,

Alessandro
www.quantitative-microscopy.org
Alessandro Esposito Alessandro Esposito
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*****
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Dear Raghavendra,

  thank you for the suggestion, very appreciated.

Cheers,

Alessandro
www.quantitative-microscopy.org
Craig Brideau Craig Brideau
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Re: imaging and fluidic control

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*****
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On Wed, Jun 7, 2017 at 4:31 AM, Alessandro <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> *****
> We have in mind to target a flow of 1-10ml/min, with a compact system that
> may allow solutions to be hosted within the frame incubators of the
> microscopes.
>

I have used magnetic-drive gear pumps for 2ml/min applications where we
needed to have continuous flow for several days. Syringe pumps won't hold
enough volume, and we had an issue with the pulsing caused by peristaltic
pumps. Micro gear pumps use the teeth in small gears as the pumping
mechanism, so they are great for steady small flow rates. The one caveat is
the inner workings of the pump come in contact with your solution, so we
were careful to only use the pump with 'control' solutions and not
contaminate it. You can get around this by having two pumps and clearly
labeling them, one for 'control' and one for 'treatment'. The one I used
had stainless steel pump bodies and Teflon pump gears so they were fairly
resistant anyway. You might be able to get away with only one pump if you
use a sufficient wash protocol at the end of your experiments. I've had
mine for over ten years and it still works quite well.

Craig
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